Saturday, 3 November 2012

Book Review #2: Hurt Go Happy


Hurt Go Happy
By: Ginny Rorby
Target: Twelve-years-old and up
Setting: Fort Bragg, California

Joey Willis is a thirteen-year-old girl living in Fort Bragg, California. When Joey was 6-years-old, she lost 70% of her aural faculty. She is often teased in school because of the Frequency Modulated system she has to use to hear her teachers. Joey meets a sign-language speaking chimp named Sukari and her owner, Charlie. Joey’s mom disapproves of the chimp and will not allow Joey to learn sign language because it will draw attention to her handicap. Joey defies her mother’s wishes and learns sign language. After an Earthquake shakes Fort Bragg, Sukari’s life is put at stake…

Hurt Go Happy, written by Ginny Rorby, is inspirational. After you finish the book, you can see Ginny Rorby was trying to say: ‘Appearances and expression do not define who we are as people.’ The theme is: ‘equality’. I think Ginny wrote this book to send a message that everyone should be treated equally no matter what his or her handicap is, and this could be treated as one of the author’s personal values. You could feel conflict happening between Joey and her mother when Joey was trying to learn sign language. The characters in Hurt Go Happy were very well written. As soon as they were introduced, you could tell what kind of characters they were (e.g. protagonist, antagonist, foil, etc.). The setting was very easy to envision as well. Two years ago I tried reading Hurt Go Happy, but I found it hard to read. My sister had read the book when she was 13-years-old and told me it was amazing. The book is meant for 10-years-old and up but I would recommend 12-years-old and up, coming from my own personal experience when I tried to read it at the age of 11. This time, when I read Hurt Go Happy, I was enthralled with the novel and I believe many other readers will enjoy it too.

3 comments:

  1. Your book review was fantastic! I was especially intrigued by the phrase that introduced the theme: "After you finish the book, you can see Ginny Rorby was trying to say: ‘Appearances and expression do not define who we are as people.’ The theme is: ‘equality’.", As that first sentence was a clear yet interesting way to get the point across. I also really enjoyed how you explained your personal experience in reading the book. Overall, you did great! :)

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  2. After I read the first paragraph of your book review I was in shock. You left me with a hook! Know I have so may books on my list to read because every time I read a book review it makes me want to read the book. Know yours is on my list. :) In the first paragraph I liked how you started off with the setting so when I read the rest I know what the background is like. In the second paragraph I loved how you used such descriptive language to explain the theme. You book review is so good! :D Your book review also relates to my science fair because you said, "everyone should be treated equally no matter what his or her handicap is." That is very true because many people think of people that are handicaped or impaired aren't as important.

    So good!!!!! Don't stop writing. :D

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  3. Jenn the brief description you wrote of the book was thorough allowing me to get a good grasp of the summary with out reading the book. it was clear this book found a positive emotional level of reading for you. Your thoughts on how inspirational and moving the book was and its ability to show that handicaps of any kinds are not how we are as individuals was very touching. It was great to see your opinion on the importance of reading such a book at an older age. Good job and keep it up!

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